Slide1
Slide10
Slide9
Slide11
Slide7
Slide4
Slide6
Slide3
Slide12
Slide8

A few words from Fanny

In 2009 I made a road trip to attend my first “traditional hot rod” show. It was a fantastic experience that inspired me to attend others. After a few years of traveling around the midwest to these shows, I had to ask myself why there was not one in western Wisconsin? Surely, there were plenty of worthy cars. Certainly, there was ample interest. I continually ran into locals at these other far off shows. Why were there none of these shows that offer so much more entertainment than a regular show?

I decided to change that. And Mississippi Mayhem was born.

A traditional hot rod show is different from other car shows in a number of ways. A traditional show celebrates all things vintage, not just the cars.

It attempts to recreate the time from which they came. There, you will not only experience the cars people drove, but also the clothes they wore, the music they listened to and items they would have purchased for their homes. That you can, too!

To maintain that feeling of stepping back in time, certain restrictions must be placed on vehicles in the immediate show area. Most notably is the year cut off. Every traditional show draws that line a slightly different place. Usually somewhere between 1960 and 1969. For Mayhem, I decided on 1964. The following year Ford introduced the Mustang, and with it the factory made hot rod or muscle car era. There are technology based restrictions as well. For example, billet wheels and white lettered tires did not exist on street cars during this time. That said, Mississippi Mayhem has nothing against cars manufactured post 1964. Quite the opposite. We love all cars! Anything with an engine really.

We welcome all cars, trucks, motorcycles, boats, snowmobiles, whatever you have to attend. But, since we are trying to establish a certain feel to the show, please understand that only vehicles meeting show criteria will be featured. Others attending will be asked to park in a highly accessible, yet separate area from the vehicles that actually represent that period of time. We call it the “pre-show” because it really is a show within the show.

In our inaugural year, we were blessed with beautiful weather. More than 250 cars and motorcycles arrived. A queen was crowned and food was downed as bands from Wisconsin, Missouri and Tennessee rocked the 2,000 attendees.

Our second year, the weather was cooler but the action was hotter. Over 400 cars made the drive through the beautiful coulees. The bands included a lot of brass that kept 3,000 attendees swing dancing.

What does the future hold? We have been honored by the reception we have received. Many have adopted the show as their own. They have as much work and pride in Mayhem as I do. I am not about to let them down. Every year will be better than the one before it.

Just what does that mean? You will have to come see for yourself.

Fanny Freckles


Mississippi Mayhem Partners
  • Auto Value
  • Explore La Crosse
  • Festival Foods
  • Mike's Custom Exhaust
  • Fast Freddies